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Mother Russia

After the battle of Stalingrad, in the WWII, the battle considered the Blodiest battle in Human History because of this scale (casualties of appx 2 mio), there was felt a need to build a monument to commemorate the heroism of the Soviets. Those soviets of Stalingrad who had managed through all odds and hardships beat the army of Hitler into surrendering, against the orders of Hitler.

The task it seems was handed to artist Yevgeny Vuchetich.

Mother Russia they call her. The monument is a Gigantic statue of the mother calling people of Stalingrad (Volggrad now) onto battle. Placed atop a hill, this statue is 52 mt tall from sword tip to base plinth.

Poised mid-stride, the statue depicts a strong woman wielding a sword in one hand and with the other calling forth her army, her people behind her. The wsord points the way ahead and above to victory, the head is turned back, in motion, the hair still swinging from movement, mouth open emitting war cries - shouting out courageous words, cheering and pointing out the way, eyes blazing, brows furrowed with passion, she beckons her people to hurry up and stop the invaders.
A strong wind blows in direction opposite to her movement, like the opposition through which she cuts through, stately and majestic, like it was nothing. Her clothes fly back, her legs move ahead. You remain enchanted thinking, is it her speed that creates the wind, or is it the force of her nature and war that causes that maelstrom.
Her left hand is open palm upward, fingers half curled, in a gesture of calling forth. Her body stretched sideways, moving, stepping forward impatient, forceful, eager to move ahead, waiting for her willing army to join her.

At a single glance, a leader whom you wil trust and give up your life for. The mother, whom you will defend. For whom the death and poverty of so many people of the city does not seem waste.

A beautiful monument, it signifies patriotism, the passion and the reason for winning difficult wars. the staute moves, in more ways than one.

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(later, I read up more on the net, apart from Wikipedia, sparce on this knowledge, read this page especially around the end is enightening. Now this statue definitely gets added to the list of things I want to do/ go to. Mother Russia is Calling.)


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Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
sashdude
2nd Feb, 2007 11:41 (UTC)
you know
there is a game i played called call of duty, the ending features a level in russia, where you have to run past and hide under the statue of mother russia, while waves of people are being felled by germans as they yell "for Mother russia" and charge, it is a beautifully rendered level, but you are right it will be great to be able to see it live..
rexzilla
2nd Feb, 2007 11:54 (UTC)
There's nothing like patriotism...
to make people lay down their lives and commit all sorts of atrocities. The USSR however was the wronged party in WW2-since Hitler (suicidally if u ask me) violated his non aggression pact with Molotov by attacking them.
The motivation level of the avg Russian vs the avg German soldier would have been very high, suffused by indignation.

This sort of sweeping expression was what Soviet art was about-you'll find lots of similar propaganda posters showing happy workers and farmers, or Stalin with children etc (to mask the fact that he killed even more people than Hitler did)

Glasnost proved to be the undoing of all this..we have Gorby to thank for that.
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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Regurgitations of my mind. Specific, Vague, Memorable, Forgettable, Thoughtless, In-depth.

More variegated than your dreams or colours off a crystal. More than I can pen down. What I can, you can read.


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